Routing Numbers and Transit Numbers

Canadian Transit Number:

Canadian Transit Number is a 9 character code used for routing of cheques (checks) and paper instruments in the banking industry. This code identifies the branch (and bank/credit union) on which the cheque is drawn. It is also known as check routing number and MICR Code.

The format of check transit number – XXXXXYYY

The first 5 digit is called branch transit number and identifies the exact branch of the bank. YYY is the institution code which identifies the bank or credit union. There is a dash (or hyphen) separating the branch code and institution code. As a general rule, bank institution numbers start with 0, 2, 3, or 6, while Credit Union and Caisse Populaire institution numbers start with 8, and Trust Company institution numbers with 5. The big 4 banks have the following institution code –

001 – Bank of Montreal
002 – Bank of Nova Scotia
003 – Royal Bank of Canada
004 – TD Canada Trust

Canadian Routing Number:

Canadian Routing Number is a 9 digit code used for electronic fund transfers (EFT) such as direct deposits, electronic payments, etc. The Routing Number are also formed using the branch code and bank code discussed above.

Routing Number Format
Routing number (EFT Code) is a 9 digit code comprising of a leading zero (0), the institution number (YYY), then the branch number (XXXXX). For example if a cheque MICR code is XXXXX-YYY, the corresponding EFT code would be 0YYYXXXXX.

If you want to setup a direct deposit or want to make a electronic fund transfer to someone’s account, the sender’s bank will ask for following three things –

1. Recipient’s Full Name
2. Recipient’s Account Number
3. Routing Number (and possibly the bank name)

Find Routing Number: Search for the routing number using our routing number search tool below –

Bank Routing Number Search

Name of the Bank and City e.g. Bank of Montreal in Vancouver



For International Transfers, bank will also ask for the swift code (also called BIC code) along with the above three details.

Difference between Routing Number and Transit Number:
Both routing number and transit numbers are formed using the branch code and institution code. However, there is a difference in the format as discussed above. The term routing number is used in connection with the electronic fund transfers (EFT) and thus also known as EFT Code while the transit number is used usually in connection with the paper instruments such as cheques. You can also find transit number on the cheque issued to you by your bank. The transit number is also called MICR code.

canadian routing transit number on cheque
Note: If a cheque code is XXXXX-YYY, the corresponding EFT code would be 0YYYXXXXX.

If you have any questions on the electronic payment or routing number, please leave a comment below. We’d be happy to help!

The Canada Trust Company Routing Numbers


Bank Routing Number Search


Name of the Bank and City e.g. The Canada Trust Company in Coquitlam


Ajax Barrie Bedford Brampton
Brantford Burlington Burnaby Calgary
Cambridge Charlottetown Chatham Coquitlam
Dartmouth Delta Don Mills Dorval
Edmonton Etobicoke Guelph Halifax
Hamilton Kamloops Kanata Kelowna
Kingston Kitchener Lethbridge London
Markham Medicine Hat Mississauga Montreal
Nanaimo Nepean Newmarket Niagara Falls
North Bay North Vancouver North York Oakville
Orleans Oshawa Ottawa Peterborough
Pickering Port Coquitlam Prince George Red Deer
Regina Richmond Richmond Hill Saint John
Saint-Laurent Sarnia Saskatoon Scarborough
Simcoe St Catharines St Thomas St. John’s
Stoney Creek Strathroy Sudbury Surrey
Thornhill Thunder Bay Toronto Vancouver
Victoria Waterloo West Vancouver Whitby
Willowdale Windsor Winnipeg Woodstock

Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) Routing Numbers


Bank Routing Number Search


Name of the Bank and City e.g. Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) in Vancouver


Abbotsford Airdrie Ajax Anjou
Aurora Barrie Bathurst Beaconsfield
Belleville Blainville Bolton Bowmanville
Bracebridge Bradford Brampton Brandon
Brantford Bridgewater Brockville Brossard
Burlington Burnaby Calgary Cambridge
Campbell River Charlottetown Chateauguay Chatham
Chicoutimi Chilliwack Concord Coquitlam
Cornwall Courtenay Cranbrook Dartmouth
Dawson Creek Delta Dollard-Des-Ormeaux Don Mills
Dorval Drummondville Duvernay Edmonton
Elmira Embrun Espanola Estevan
Etobicoke Forest Fort Erie Fort McMurray
Fort Saskatchewan Fort St John Fredericton Gatineau
Georgetown Granby Grande Prairie Guelph
Halifax Hamilton Happy Valley – Goose Bay Iqaluit
Joliette Jonquiere Kamloops Kanata
Kelowna Kenora Keswick Kingston
Kirkland Kitchener Lachine Langley
Lasalle Laval Leamington Lethbridge
Levis Lions Head London Longueuil
Lunenburg Maple Maple Ridge Markham
Medicine Hat Melville Milton Miramichi
Mississauga Moncton Mont-Royal Montmagny
Montreal Montreal-nord Moose Jaw Moosomin
Mount Brydges Nanaimo Nepean New Westminster
Newmarket Niagara Falls Niagara on the Lake North Battleford
North Bay North Gower North Vancouver North York
Oakville Orangeville Orillia Orleans
Oshawa Ottawa Owen Sound Penticton
Peterborough Petrolia Pickering Pointe-Claire
Port Alberni Port Coquitlam Port Hawkesbury Portland
Prince Albert Prince George Quebec Quispamsis
Red Deer Regina Repentigny Richmond
Richmond Hill Rimouski Rouyn-Noranda Saint John
Saint-Bruno Saint-Georges Saint-Hyacinthe Saint-Jerome
Saint-Laurent Saint-Leonard Sarnia Saskatoon
Sault Ste Marie Scarborough Sept-Iles Shaunavon
Shawinigan Sherbrooke Sherwood Park St Albert
St Catharines St John’s St Thomas St-Felicien
St-Jean-sur-Richelieu St. John’s Stoney Creek Stratford
Strathroy Sudbury Sundridge Surrey
Swan River Swift Current Sydney Terrebonne
Thompson Thornhill Thunder Bay Timmins
Toronto Trois-Rivieres Truro Vancouver
Varennes Vaughan Verdun Vernon
Victoria Victoriaville Wallaceburg Waterloo
Wawa Welland Wendake West Vancouver
Westmount Weyburn Whitby White Rock
Whitehorse Winchester Windsor Winnipeg
Woodbridge Woodstock Yellowknife

CIBC Routing Number

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) is one of the biggest banks in Canada. You can find routing transit number for all branches of CIBC bank in Canada. Use the CIBC Routing Number Search tool or just click on the name of the city where your CIBC branch is situated. Routing Numbers are 9 digit bank identification number which are used for initiating direct debit, wire transfers, check routing and other electronic payments. You can also locate the routing number on the check book issued by your bank.


CIBC Routing Number Search


Name of the Bank and City e.g. CIBC in Vancouver


Abbotsford Ajax Ancaster Antigonish
Assiniboia Aurora Barrie Bedford
Belleville Blairmore Bolton Bowmanville
Brampton Brandon Brantford Bridgewater
Brossard Burlington Burnaby Calgary
Cambridge Campbell River Castlegar Charlottetown
Chatham Chilliwack Coboconk Cochrane
Concord Coquitlam Cornwall Courtenay
Cranbrook Dartmouth Delta Dollard-Des-Ormeaux
Dorval Drummondville Edmonton Essex
Etobicoke Fort McMurray Fraser Lake Fredericton
Gatineau Georgetown Gloucester Goderich
Granby Grande Prairie Greenwood Guelph
Hagersville Halifax Hamilton Harbour Breton
Islington Jasper Kamloops Kanata
Kelowna Kincardine Kingston Kirkland
Kirkland Lake Kitchener Lachine Langley
Lasalle Laval Lethbridge Lloydminster
London Longueuil Maple Markham
Medicine Hat Milton Milverton Mississauga
Moncton Montreal Moose Jaw Mount Pearl
Mount-Royal Nanaimo Nanton Napanee
Nepean New Liskeard New Westminster Newmarket
Niagara Falls North Battleford North Bay North Vancouver
North York Oakville Orillia Orleans
Oshawa Ottawa Penticton Peterborough
Pickering Picton Pierrefonds Pitt Meadows
Pointe-Claire Port Alberni Port Colborne Port Hardy
Port McNeill Powell River Prince Albert Prince George
Princeton Quebec Rankin Inlet Red Deer
Red Lake Redcliff Regina Richmond
Richmond Hill Saint John Saint-Hubert Saint-Hyacinthe
Saint-Laurent Saint-Leonard Sarnia Saskatoon
Sault Ste Marie Scarborough Selkirk Sept-Iles
Sherbrooke Sherwood Park Sorel-Tracy St Albert
St Catharines St Thomas St-Jean-sur-Richelieu St. John’s
Stettler Stoney Creek Sudbury Surrey
Thetford-Mines Thornhill Thunder Bay Tofino
Toronto Trois-Rivieres Truro Val-d’Or
Vancouver Vaughan Vegreville Vermilion
Vernon Victoria Vineland Vulcan
Waterloo Welland West Vancouver Wetaskiwin
Weyburn Whitby Whitehorse Windsor
Winnipeg Woodbridge Woodstock Yellowknife
Yorkton

Canada’s Top Banks’ Ratings Downgraded to ‘Negative’ by S&P

Canada’s top banks got a “negative” ratings from ratings agency S&P over concerns about the federal government’s stance on possible bailouts in the future.

The decision is taken on the concern that the government might be reluctant to “bail out” top banks with tax-payers money if another financial meltdown (similar to 2008-2009) happens in the future. This virtually takes away the “too big to fail” status from the banks and make them susceptible to liquidation in another event of financial meltdown.

“The outlook revision reflects our expectation of reduced potential for extraordinary government support,” wrote credit analyst Lidia Parfeniuk in a note released Friday (8th Aug 2014).

The negative outlook covered all of the major Canadian Banks – Royal Bank of Canada (RBC), Toronto-Dominion Bank (TD Canada Trust), Bank of Nova Scotia (Scotia Bank), Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBM), Bank of Montreal (BMO) and National Bank of Canada (NBC).

This is important to note that Canadian Banks are counted among the world’s most stable banks. Despite the downgrades, the TSX financial sector was ahead 0.55 per cent on Monday, with all of the major bank stocks higher.

How to Resolve a Problem with your Bank

If you have a problem or complaint at your bank or trust company, you can follow these steps to get help.

Important Note:
Every time you talk to someone, write down their name, the date you talked to them, what they told you, and if some part of the problem was fixed. Keep your papers about the problem. If someone asks you to give them the papers, give them a copy and keep the original paper.

You must do the steps in order (you can’t skip a step).

Step 1
Explain your problem to the staff at your branch. You can ask to talk to a supervisor or a manager of the bank branch.

Step 2
If the branch staff don’t fix your problem, ask them for their brochure about complaints. The brochure has telephone numbers for senior managers or customer care centres. Call the number and explain your problem. Many banks also have their own ombudsman to help customers with complaints.

Step 3
If you still have a problem, you can call an independent ombudsman who doesn’t work for the bank. If your bank account is at RBC Royal Bank, call ADR Chambers at 1-877-307-0014. For all other banks, call the Ombudsman for Banking Services and Investments at 1-888-451-4519. The ombudsman will talk to you and to the bank, and look at your papers about the problem. The ombudsman will decide what is fair and tell the bank to do it.

You can also go to court to get a problem fixed, but it is more expensive. Also, if you go to court, you can’t use the ombudsman.

If you have a problem at a credit union or caisse populaire, ask to speak to the manager. If the manager doesn’t solve your problem, ask what to do about complaints. The provinces have government offices that can help you with a problem after you try to fix it with the credit union or caisse.

Economic Action Plan 2014 to Benefit New Brunswick and Canada

Speaking to the Greater Moncton Chamber of Commerce, Finance Minister Joe Oliver today highlighted the many benefits of the Harper Government’s Economic Action Plan 2014 for New Brunswick and the rest of Canada.  He also reaffirmed the Government’s top priority of creating jobs and economic growth through low taxes and enhanced trade, while remaining on track for a balanced budget in 2015.

Quick Facts about Economic Action Plan 2014

  • Since the Government introduced the Economic Action Plan to respond to the global recession, Canada has performed better than most developed countries.
  • Both the International Monetary Fund and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development expect Canada to be among the strongest growing economies in the Group of Seven (G-7) over this year and next.
  • New Brunswick will receive $860 million over 10 years in dedicated federal funding, including $390 million under the New Building Canada Fund and $470 million under the federal Gas Tax Fund.
  • On June 20th, the Prime Minister announced that New Brunswick’s Propel ICT has been chosen to advance in the selection process under the Canada Accelerator and Incubator Program.
  • Under the Canada Research Chairs program, the Government provides annual support totaling $1.3 million for 10 leading researchers based in Moncton post-secondary institutions.

“To keep New Brunswick and Canada strong, we must build on our firm economic and fiscal fundamentals, and a track record that is the envy of many other countries. Honouring this commitment, including a return to budgetary balance in 2015, will help foster a growing, healthy economy that creates stable, well-paying jobs, right across this country.”

– Joe Oliver, Minister of Finance

Download full economic budget plan 2014.

CDIC Insurance for Joint Deposits – How it is Calculated?

CDIC (Canadian Deposit Insurance Corporation) insures eligible deposits at each CDIC member institution up to a maximum of $100,000 (principal and interest combined) per depositor (or, in the case of joint deposits, per set of joint owners), in each of the following:

  1. Savings held in one name
  2. Joint deposits (savings held in more than one name)
  3. Savings held in trust for another person
  4. Savings held in Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs)
  5. Savings held in Registered Retirement Income Funds (RRIFs)
  6. Savings held in Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSAs)
  7. Money held for paying realty taxes on mortgaged property

To be eligible for deposit insurance, deposits must be payable in Canada and in Canadian currency. As a general rule, a deposit is considered to be payable in Canada if it is held at a branch or office of a CDIC member institution in Canada.

Eligible deposits include savings accounts, chequing accounts, GICs or other term deposits with an original term to maturity of 5 years or less, money orders, certified cheques, and bank drafts issued by CDIC members.

As stated above, eligible joint deposits are insured separately from deposits in each person’s own name alone at the same member institution, up to a maximum of $100,000 (principal and interest combined). However, this deposit insurance is payable per set of joint depositors; that is, the joint owners together receive a single deposit insurance payment of up to $100,000.

To be eligible for separate CDIC insurance coverage, the following information about a joint deposit has to appear on the records of the member institution:

  • a statement that the deposits are owned jointly; and
  • the name and address of each of the joint owners.

It is important to note that each person identified as a joint owner must have a genuine ownership interest in the deposit for separate deposit insurance protection to apply. The creation of artificial joint deposits for the sole purpose of obtaining additional deposit insurance protection is contrary to the intent of the CDIC Act.

Source: CDIC Website

TD Canada Trust Routing Numbers

TD Canada Trust is the personal, small business and commercial banking operation of the Toronto-Dominion Bank (TD) in Canada. TD Canada Trust offers a range of financial services and products to more than 10 million Canadian customers through more than 1,100 branches and 2,600 “Green Machine” ABMs. (Automated Banking Machines)

The current TD Canada Trust division was formed after TD’s acquisition of Canada Trust in 2000. All new and most existing accounts are officially issued by TD Bank (Institution Number: 004), although Canada Trust (Institution Number: 509) remains a separate subsidiary entity, and remains the issuer of accounts opened at that institution prior to the merger.

You can find routing number for all branches of TD Canada Trust using the below table –


Bank Routing Number Search


Name of the Bank and City e.g. TD Canada Trust in Vancouver


Abbotsford Airdrie Ajax Allan
Alliston Amherst Amherstburg Ancaster
Aurora Aylmer Bancroft Barrie
Bathurst Bedford Belleville Blainville
Bolton Bowmanville Bracebridge Brampton
Brandon Brantford Bridgewater Brockville
Brossard Burlington Burnaby Calgary
Cambridge Campbell River Camrose Charlesbourg
Charlottetown Chatham Chicoutimi Chilliwack
Cobourg Cold Lake Collingwood Coquitlam
Cornwall Courtenay Cranbrook Dartmouth
Delhi Delta Dollard-Des-Ormeaux Don Mills
Dorval Downsview Drummondville Duncan
Dundas Dunnville East York Edmonton
Elora Espanola Etobicoke Fort Erie
Fort McMurray Fredericton Gananoque Gaspe
Gatineau Georgetown Gloucester Goderich
Grande Prairie Grimsby Guelph Halifax
Hamilton Hanover High Prairie Hull
Huntsville Ingersoll Jasper Kamloops
Kanata Kapuskasing Kelowna Kentville
Kingston Kirkland Kirkland Lake Kitchener
Langley Lasalle Laval Leamington
Leduc Lethbridge Lindsay Lloydminster
London Longueuil Maple Maple Ridge
Markham Medicine Hat Midland Milton
Miramichi Mission Mississauga Moncton
Montreal Moose Jaw Mount Pearl Nanaimo
Nepean New Glasgow New Hamburg New Liskeard
New Westminster Newmarket Niagara Falls North Battleford
North Bay North Vancouver North York Oakville
Orangeville Orillia Orleans Oromocto
Oshawa Ottawa Outremont Owen Sound
Oyen Paris Parksville Pembroke
Penticton Perth Peterborough Petrolia
Pickering Picton Pierrefonds Pointe-Claire
Port Colborne Port Coquitlam Port Hope Preeceville
Prince Albert Prince George Quebec Quesnel
Quispamsis Red Deer Regina Repentigny
Richmond Richmond Hill Riverview Rocanville
Saint John Saint-Laurent Sainte-Foy Sarnia
Saskatoon Sault Ste Marie Scarborough Sherbrooke
Sherwood Park Sidney Simcoe Spruce Grove
St Albert St Catharines St Paul St Thomas
St-Jean St-Leonard St. John’s Stittsville
Stoney Creek Stouffville Stratford Strathroy
Streetsville Sudbury Summerside Surrey
Sussex Swan River Sydney Terrebonne
Thornhill Thunder Bay Tillsonburg Timmins
Toronto Trenton Truro Tsawwassen
Uxbridge Val-d’Or Vancouver Vaughan
Verdun Vernon Victoria Walkerton
Wallaceburg Wasaga Beach Waterdown Waterloo
Welland West Vancouver Westmount Weston
Whitby White Rock Whitehorse Willowdale
Windsor Wingham Winnipeg Woodbridge
Woodstock Yarmouth York Yorkton

Montreal Trust Company Routing Transit Numbers

Montreal Trust Company of Canada was originally established in 1889 as the Montreal Safe Company and became a trust company only a few years later. In 1994, the Montreal Trust Company became a member of the Scotia Group of Companies when Scotiabank completed its acquisition.

Mailing address for Montreal Trust Company
Executive Offices, Scotia Plaza, 9th Floor
44 King Street W
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M5H 1H1

Bank Routing Number Search

Name of the Bank and City e.g. MONTREAL TRUST COMPANY OF CANADA in Ottawa


Brockville Burlington Burnaby Calgary
Cambridge Charlesbourg Charlottetown Edmonton
Guelph Halifax Hamilton Kelowna
Kingston Kitchener Laval London
Montreal Mount-Royal Nanaimo North Vancouver
Oakville Oshawa Ottawa Outremont
Pickering Pointe-Claire Prince George Quebec
Regina Richmond Richmond Hill Saint John
Saint-Lambert Sainte-Foy Saskatoon St Albert
St Catharines St-Bruno-de-Montarville St. John’s Stoney Creek
Sudbury Toronto Truro Vancouver
Vernon Victoria Waterloo West Vancouver
Westmount White Rock Windsor Winnipeg